Jobs for College Students at Ferris State University

Ferris State University is a public university located in Big Rapids, Michigan. There is an assortment of job resources located conveniently on campus to support the institution’s student population of over 12,000 undergraduates. Many of them can be found on the university’s “Job Postings” page on its website. These student job resources are very helpful for students who need some way to earn money while they study. Here are 7 ways that students at Ferris State University can make a buck while studying.

1. Security Administrative Assistant at Southwestern Michigan College

This is a part-time student job position at Southwestern Michigan College available to students at Ferris State University. The position requires 20 hours of work per week. The Security Administrative Assistant is expected to report to the Director of Campus Security. Interested parties may apply online.

The campus at Southwestern Michigan College.

2. Business Office Assistant at Southwestern Michigan College

This is a part-time employment opportunity at Southwestern Michigan College available to students at Ferris State University. Students can expect to work approximately 20 hours a week in this position. Student employees will assist in all aspects of the cashier’s window, including: processing student payments, waiting on students at the window, answering the phone, updating spreadsheets, and filing. Interested parties can apply for the position on the company website.

The entrance to Southwestern Michigan College.

3. Bookseller at the Ferris State Bookstore

This is a part-time employment opportunity offered to students at Ferris State University. Student employees are expected to work about 20 hours a week. Employees will attend to customers’ needs as well as shelve and organize books. Interested parties can apply for the position on the company website.

The inside of a book store.

4. Cleaning Captain at Taco Bell

This is a part-time employment opportunity in proximity to students at Ferris State University. Student employees may be expected to work up to 20 hours a week. The Cleaning Captain will oversee all major and minor cleaning operations at the Taco Bell location. Interested parties can apply for the position on the company website.

Image result for taco bell
Meals available at Taco Bell.

5. Grocery Clerk at Meijer

This is a part-time employment opportunity in proximity to students at Ferris State University. Student employees may be expected to work up to 20 hours a week. The Grocery Clerk will make sure that all customers find everything that they need and help them check out their purchases. Interested parties can apply for the position on the company website.

The inside of a grocery store.

6. Server at Ruby Tuesday

This is a part-time employment opportunity in proximity to students at Ferris State University. Student employees may be expected to work up to 20 hours a week. The Server will take down clients’ food orders and make sure that all clients are happy with their experience dining at Ruby Tuesday.
Interested parties can apply for the position on the company website.

The exterior of a Ruby Tuesday.

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10 of the Coolest Courses at OleMiss

The University of Mississippi is a public research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. The university offers many courses to cover the academic needs of its over 18,000 undergraduates. Some of these courses may be counted as elective credit and not necessarily towards a student’s chosen course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at the University of Mississippi.

1. AAS 170 – Introduction to African History

In this course, students will be introduced to the history of the diverse continent of Africa from the earliest times to the present day. While it will be impossible to cover all of the diversity of Africa in this course, the most major cultures and events of historical significance will be covered and discussed in detail, and students will gain a better understanding of Africa as a whole and its relationship to the rest of the world.

The African continent on the globe.

2. AH 102 – Introduction to Non-Western Art

This course serves as a chronological and comparative survey of indigenous, non-Western arts created in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania. Non-Western art will be viewed through a critical lens and compared with Western art, and students will discuss the major similarities and differences between the two as they gain a deeper appreciation for non-Western art through their studies.

A famous work of Japanese art.

3. ANTH 101 – Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of all things human, from our beginnings to the modern times, and it is a science that consists of the cultural anthropology and biological anthropology sub-fields. This introductory course offers a general introduction to anthropology and its four main sub-divisions, including cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology,and anthropological linguistics.

The evolution of the modern human.

4. ART 326 – Watercolor

In this art course, students will explore watercolor painting techniques, and the various materials and tools that they can use to explore water-based media on paper. Students will create their own original paintings in watercolor, and give and receive in-class critiques of each other’s work in a constructive workshop setting.

A painting made in watercolor.

5. AH 315 – Egyptian Art and Archaeology

In this art history course, students will explore Egyptian art and archaeology from 3000 B.C.E. through the first century B.C.E. Art and archaeology will be explored within a cultural context, paying special attention to the Egyptian empire and its reign over the world and eventual downfall. The trajectory of how works of ancient Egyptian art were taken out of modern Egypt will also be examined.

A work of Egyptian art.

6. PHIL 308 – Buddhism

This course is an overview of Buddhism in both its historical and contemporary contexts. Students will learn about the major ideas of Buddhism, its origins as a world religion and philosophy, and its impact on the modern world. They will also follow its spread and explore why it has become so popular all over the world. This course is reading and discussion heavy.

The Buddha, founder of Buddhism.

7. FR 101 – Elementary French I

In this course, students will receive an introduction to the French language. The course will emphasize reading, writing, and conversational skills for basic communication. Students will also gain cultural and linguistic insight into the French-speaking world. The course is intended for students who have taken fewer than two courses in high-school French.

The French flag and the Eiffel Tower.

8. ART 683 – Digital Photography

This course emphasizes a fine arts approach to digital photography. Students will develop their own personal photographic style as they photograph the world around them, and learn about theoretical, conceptual and contemporary issues surrounding digital photography. They will also follow the way it has become popularized as an art form in the modern world.

A digital camera ready to shoot a picture.

9. ASTR 103 – Astronomy I

This introductory astronomy course intended for non-majors combines lectures, demonstrations in astronomy, laboratory assignments involving celestial mechanics and light, and observations through an optical telescope. Lecture sections meet twice a week in the daytime and laboratory sections meet once a week in the night or afternoon, for an optimal stargazing experience.

The Andromeda galaxy surrounded by stars.

10. AAS 392 – Modern Africa

In this course, students will analyze the major trends in African history from the year 1800 to the present day. Through their studies, students will gain a better understanding of the cultural, social, political, and economic forces present in societies across the continent of Africa. The course is heavy in reading and discussion.

The political boundaries of modern Africa.

10 of the Coolest Courses at North Dakota State University

North Dakota State University is a public research university located in Fargo, North Dakota. The university offers many courses to cover the academic needs of its nearly 12,000 undergraduates. Some of these courses may be counted as elective credit and not necessarily towards a student’s chosen course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at North Dakota State University.

1. CFS 210: Introduction to Food Science and Technology

This course serves as an overview of food components, food quality, nutrition, processing, packaging, safety, sanitation laws, sensory evaluation, distribution, and utilization. Students will learn all of the basics of food science and technology and have them mastered by the end of this course.

Food inside different laboratory equipment.

2. ART 120: Painting I

This course will introduce students to the basics of painting using a variety of different materials. Painting assignments will include painting the human figure and using acrylics, oils, pastel, and mixed-media. Students will become acquainted with the art of painting by the end of this course by creating their own original works.

A painting of a tree and the moon.

3. ENGL 167: Introduction to English Studies

This course introduces students to studies in and of the English language such as literature, writing studies, and linguistics, and the ways that these areas of English are studied. Students will gain a better understanding of the way that the English language is used and functions.

Books and a single feather.

4. HIST 101: Western Civilization I

This course serves as an introductory survey to Western Civilization, from prehistorical times to the year 1648. The course will emphasize the major political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments that occurred over this period. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the time period through writing and discussion.

Napoleon Bonaparte riding a horse.

5. PSYC 111: Introduction to Psychology

This course provides students with an overview of the major concepts and figures relevant to the field of psychology. Students will receive an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and related mental processes. Sub-fields of psychology will not be delved into too deeply in this course.

Sigmund Freud wearing a suit.

6. ENGL 222: Introduction to Poetry

In this course, students will examine different poetic forms, including the uses of figurative language and the techniques of rhythm and meter, as well as imagery and structure. Both traditional and contemporary lyrics will be paid close attention. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the art of poetry.

A book containing poetic works.

7. ART 170: Printmaking I

This course serves as an introduction to basic printmaking techniques and materials, including mono-print, collagraph, intaglio, relief, and serigraphy. Both traditional and nontoxic methods will be employed in this course as students create their own original prints.

A print made by a print maker.

8. ENGL 220: Introduction to Literature

In this course, students will read and discuss various works of poetry, drama, and fiction, with emphasis on the use of common literary terms. Both classic and contemporary works will be explored in this course, with a focus on appreciation of the art of literature.

An assortment of different books.

9. ART 180: Photography I

This course serves as an introduction to the basics of photography as a serious art form. Assignments will be given in both black and white photography and color photography. Students will gain experience with black and white processing and printing as they complete their work for this course.

A photographer taking a picture.

10. ENGL 225: Introduction to Film

This course serves as a general introduction to film studies and film criticism, including analysis of narrative and stylistic elements of films for their artistic and aesthetic merits, and these films’ reflections of and statements on society.

An assortment of film equipment.

10 of the Coolest Courses at North Carolina A&T State University

North Carolina A&T State University is a public, land-grant research university located in Greensboro, North Carolina. The institution offers many courses to cover the academic needs of its over 10,000 undergraduates. Some of these courses may be counted as elective credit and not necessarily towards a student’s chosen course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at North Carolina A&T State University.

1. PHYS 101: Introduction to Astronomy

In this course, students will learn about the basics of astronomy as they examine the night sky, the seasons, the phases of the moon, eclipses, gravity, light, telescopes, the solar system, stars, and galaxies. Students will be expected to make their own astronomical observations based on the theory they have learned in class.

A telescope set up for stargazing.

2. BIOL 101: Concepts of Biology

This course will introduce students to science and the scientific method, basic biochemistry theory and practices, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, reproduction, and genetics. Central concepts relevant to the biological sciences will be emphasized during work that students perform in the laboratory.

The double-helix, the structure of DNA.

3. BIOL 369: Human Anatomy

In this course, students will be introduced to general human anatomy, and the various functions of different structures located within the human body. Laboratory work will pay particular attention to the fundamental structure of the human body. Students are expected to participate in all laboratory work.

Several depictions of the human body.

4. BIOL 370: Human Physiology

In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of human physiology, with emphasis on basic principles and mechanisms of physiological functioning of body cells, tissues, and systems within the human vessel. Students will be able to apply important physiological concepts in their laboratory work.

Organs of the human body.

5. GEOG 200: Principles of Geography

In this course, students will familiarize themselves with the physical characteristics of the earth’s surface, including but not limited to land forms, climate, vegetation, and soil. The course will focus on variations across the globe, and interactions among these physical characteristics in a physical environment.

A map of the world.

6. BIOL 220: Basic Microbiology

In this course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of microbiology and the role of microorganisms in daily life. Infectious diseases and immunology are some of the most important topics that will be covered in this course. Laboratory work in this course will introduce students to principles of microscopy, specimen preparation for light microscopy, aseptic techniques, cultivation techniques, and the biochemical activities of microorganisms.

An assortment of different micro-organisms.

7. HIST 208: History of Asian Religions

In this course, students will learn about the origins, doctrines, development, spread, and impact of the most significant Asian religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, and Taoism. Students will pay particular attention to the evolution of these religions and systems of belief over time.

The Yin-Yang, a symbol important to Taoism.

8. BIOL 665: Evolution

In this course, students will study the genetics of populations and sources of genetic variation; causes of genetic change in populations, including but not limited to evolution by natural selection; speciation; and the general evolutionary history of life on earth. Through these studies, students will gain a more in-depth understanding of how evolution in a species occurs.

Evolution of the human from a common ancestor.

9. HIST 231: Genocide

In this course, students will explore the concept of genocide, which is the purposeful elimination of a specific group of people. After taking a beginning theoretical approach, students will apply their new knowledge to specific case studies of genocide throughout history in order to understand and prevent repetitions of this pattern of violence.

Nazis who committed genocide against the Jews and others.

10. BIOL 668: Animal Behavior

In this course, students will focus on the qualitative and quantitative differences between behavioral characteristics of different animals at different evolutionary levels. Adaptive differences in behavior and the development of behavioral patterns will be given particular focus in this course.

A koala ready for a snack.

10 of the Coolest Courses at Niagara College

Niagara College is a public college located within the Niagara Region of Southern Ontario, Canada. The college offers many courses to cover the academic needs of its nearly 3,000 undergraduates. Some of these courses may be counted as elective credit and not necessarily towards a student’s chosen course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at Niagara College.

1. ACTN1102P – Finding Your Actor’s Voice

After completing this course, students will become “Professional Voice Users” as they gain a deeper understanding of how the voice functions and how to properly maintain and control it. Articulation and discipline of the voice will be studied in depth as students find their voice through a variety of different vocal exercises.

Actors who have found their voice.

2. BAKG1008C – Cake Craft I

In this course, students will be introduced to the production of basic cakes. Focus will be on detail and precision. Students will learn through demonstrations and hands-on exercises, and then will produce various styles of cake bases and decorating styles. With this new knowledge added to their repertoire, students will become better pastry chefs.

A meticulously crafted chocolate cake.

3. CANN9102P – Regulations of Cannabis Industry

In this course, students will be introduced to the Health Canada regulations governing the medical and recreational cannabis industry in Canada. Familiarity with these regulations is key to working in the cannabis production industry. The Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) will serve as the guiding document for this course. Students will have the opportunity to put their new knowledge to the test during this course.

A singular leaf of cannabis.

4. HORT1751C – Floral Design I

This course introduces students to the basics of retail floral design and is the first in a series of floral design courses offered at Niagara College. Students will be introduced to horticultural and retail theory, professional floral design demonstrations, and extensive practical training in the design and construction of different geometric and contemporary floral arrangements.

Flowers that could be used for a floral arrangement.

5. DSGN1269P – Colour Theory

In this Graphic Design course, students will demonstrate their skills in designing with color and develop a greater sensitivity to color after extensive study of color theory in works of graphic design, be it their own or others’. Topics covered will include additive and subtractive color, hue, value, intensity, proportion, and placement in a composition.

An assortment of different colors.

6. HSTL1103P – Hairstyling and Design I

In this course, students will gain the fundamental skills necessary for the art of styling hair. The course will focus on finishing hair properly with blow-drying, finger setting, roller setting, and long hair dressing, all necessary skills for students to later be able to thrive in the hairdressing industry.

A woman who just had her hair styled.

7. BRTF1115P – Photography Essentials

This course will introduce students to the basics of the art of photography, including basic composition, photographic lenses, exposure and manipulation of the digital image, and more. Additionally, students will receive an introduction to Lightroom and Photoshop, which they can later use to edit their works.

A photograph that plays with light.

8. OEVT1122P – Sensory Evaluation of Wines I

In this course, students will learn how to critically evaluate a wine’s sensory properties in order to make a judgment on quality. Students will also develop the language skills needed to express these impressions in a clear manner. Topics to be covered in this course include the physiology and psychology of sensory analysis; the elements of wine quality and how to assess them; description of wine and appropriate use of wine terminology; major wine styles and the influence of wine-making variables; common wine faults, and wine and food matching.

Two glasses of wine, red and white.

9. HSTL1104P – Hair Colouring I

This course is designed to give aspiring hairstylists the necessary fundamental skills to be able to later work with all aspects of hair colouring. Students will learn how to color the most beautiful blondes, brilliant reds and richest brunettes. They will also receive in-depth instruction in basic formulation, lightening and bleaching techniques, dimensional colouring, and corrective work.

Cranberry-colored hairstyles, long and short.

10. BRTF1141P – Film Making I

This course will introduce students to the basics of film making. Students will study concepts and practices like visual storytelling, cinematic space and time, film continuity, cinematography and film editing. The emphasis of this course is technical, but stylistic and aesthetic elements play a part as well.

A person and a film reel.

10 of the Coolest Courses at Mount Holyoke College

Mount Holyoke College is a women’s liberal arts college located in South Hadley, Massachusetts. The college offers many courses to cover the academic needs of its over 2,000 undergraduates. Some of these courses may be counted as elective credit and not necessarily towards a student’s selected course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at Mount Holyoke College.

1. ARTH-100PW – Image and Environment: The Power of Images

This course is intended to help students to develop an awareness of how visuals shape our reality. Students will explore the role that images have played in human lives across history within different cultures. Topics to be covered include living statues, votive offerings, voodoo figures, relics, idolatry, iconoclasm, propaganda, and censorship.

Two patched-up voodoo dolls.

2. GEOG-105 – World Regional Geography

This course is a survey of the major geographical regions of the world in terms of geographical features, resource distributions, population characteristics, cultural and social factors, patterns of urban growth and industrialization, and more. Various fields of sub-geography will also be covered in the course.

A map of the world.

3. ENGL-248 – Effective Public Speaking

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop and improve their public speaking skills in both different academic and professional situations. Students will prepare and present their own speeches, identify their strengths and weaknesses based on reception, and improve as speakers from their evaluations.

Somebody speaking to a crowd.

4. ARCH-201 – Introduction to Architecture

In this course, students will be introduced to architecture and its many facets, including history, theory, and design of landscapes, buildings, and cities. Besides covering the history of human habitation, students will also gain the skills to look at different types of architecture through a critical and comparative lens. Students will also learn how to speak and write about the art of architecture.

The Colosseum in Rome, Italy.

5. ANTHR-204 – Anthropology of Modern Japan

This course will allow students to explore the anthropology of modern Japan by looking at culture as it exists within Japan, and at the cultural exchanges and economic relationships that Japan has with other countries and the rest of the modern world. While issues covered in this course may vary from semester to semester, they tend to center around topics concerning work, women, minorities, and popular culture.

A cherry blossom tree in Japan.

6. ARTST-137CD – Topics in Studio Art: Costume Design I

In this course, students will be introduced to the art and work of the costumer designer in the context of the performing arts. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how the designer’s work impacts the overall theatrical production, and what strategies are employed during the costume design process. Students will learn how to put their own costume design ideas onto paper.

Costumes in a theatrical production.

7. ENGL-201 – Introduction to Creative Writing

In this course, students will practice writing in various narrative forms. Writing exercises will lead to the development of longer works, like stories and sketches. Works created by students will be workshopped in a classroom setting, which will help students to improve their work as they make later revisions. Concision, clarity, and creativity are emphasized in this course.

Somebody trying to write creatively.

8. DANCE-171 – Studies in Dance History

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the history of the art of dance in the 20th century. Materials used in class will include readings, video and film viewings, guest performances, individual research projects, and classroom discussions. Topics that will be covered in this class may include European and American ballet, the modern dance movement, contemporary and avant-garde experimentation, African American dance forms, jazz dance, and other cultural dance traditions.

A dancer making a leap.

9. CLASS-205 – Cleopatra: The Not Humble Woman

In this course, students will study Cleopatra both as a political figure of her time and as an enemy queen. Through the lens of Cleopatra, students will explore tensions within Roman society over the nature of authority and empire. Relevant readings include Virgil, Horace, Propertius, Lucan, Caesar, Sallust, Plutarch and the plays of Shakespeare and Shaw.

Cleopatra, famous queen of Egypt.

10. GNDST-101 – Introduction to Gender Studies

In this course, students will receive an introduction to social, cultural, historical, and political perspectives on gender and the construction of gender. This course is heavy on discussion and writing, and will explore the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality in various settings and contexts. Some issues that will be covered include distinctions between sex and gender, women’s economic status, masculinity, sexual violence, queer movements, racism, and feminist activism across nations.

The two traditionally recognized genders.

10 of the Coolest Courses at Morgan State University

Morgan State University is a public urban research university located in Baltimore, Maryland. The university offers many courses to its over 6,000 undergraduates that can count for elective credit and not necessarily towards their selected course of study. Many students may wish to take electives in order to balance out their academic schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at Morgan State University.

1. AFST 350 – Africana Studies

In this course, students take the Africana studies approach to the study of various aspects of African Diasporic cultures. It focuses on the major developments among and achievements of peoples belonging to the African Diaspora. Students will take a historical and cultural approach to learning in this course.

A map of the continent of Africa.

2. GENL 398 – Seminar in Great Books I

This course focuses on a limited number of literary masterpieces and examines them as a product of the cultures in which they were created. Some aspects of the culture that will be focused on are history, politics, science and technology, art, aesthetics, literature, sociology, and cultural values. This course seeks to expose students to significant literary works, while providing global perspectives and exploring diverse works.

The cover of Don Quixote.

3. GENL 497 – Seminar in the World of Music

This course exposes students to the most significant historical developments in music and the ways that they pertain to human civilization. Students will explore a number of trends and artistic forms present in music as they developed in different various cultures across the world.

The composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

4. GENL 397 – Seminar in the Visual Arts

In this course, students will examine different historical developments pertaining to the visual arts and the ways that they have influenced human civilization. Students will identify and analyze artistic trends present in different societies over time. They will also compare and analyze artistic forms present across different cultures.

Sculpture of Thalia, Muse of Comedy.

5. GENL 399 – Seminar in Great Issues of Contemporary Society I

In this course, students will explore the major issues present in contemporary society. Extensive readings and in-class discussions will play a large part in the course. Critical issues that will be discussed in a classroom setting include the environment, science and technology, world hunger, and the arms race.

Climate change as it is occurring in the modern world.

6. GENL 498 – Seminar in Great Books II

The second half of this course, like the first part, focuses on a number of masterpieces of world literature, their major themes, their conception and their reception, and their relationship with the society and greater world in which they were created. The course is reading-heavy, and discussions will play a prominent role in the course.

The cover of Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.

7. GENL 201 – Computer Literacy, Technology, Society, and Human Values

This course will expose students to the basic components of computing and the use of computing in everyday activities. It also examines modern technology, and the impact that it has had on the greater society, its culture, and its values, as we live in a world more globalized and connected than it ever has been before.

A desktop computer made by Dell.

8. GENL 499 – Seminar in Great Issues of Contemporary Society II

This is a continuation course that focuses on the major issues of our modern society, how they came about, and how we can begin to fix them. The course will include extensive reading and in-class discussion. Issues that will be discussed include those pertaining to the environment, science and technology, world hunger, and the arms race. Issues important to living in an urban community will also be addressed.

People participating in community service.

9. GENL 396 – Service Learning I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with practical experience working in community organizations. Students will select a service organization with previously defined service objectives and learn as they work within that organization for the benefit of the surrounding greater community. After the work is completed, students will compare and contrast their experiences to that of their peers.

A compilation of hands ready to serve.

10. GENL 496 – Service Learning II

In this course, which serves as a continuation of its first part, students will work extensively with a community service organization with pre-existing service objectives in order to learn about the structure and functioning of these kinds of organizations and to gain practical experience in the field. After service work is completed, students will compare their individual experiences to those of their peers.

A community of people picking up garbage.

10 of the Coolest Courses at Morehouse College

Morehouse College is a private, all-male, liberal arts college located in Atlanta, Georgia. The institution offers many courses to its over 2,000 undergraduates that can count as electives and not necessarily towards their selected major. Many students may wish to take these courses in order to balance out their schedule and ensure that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered to students at Morehouse College.

1. HCTM 225 – Classic African-American Cinema

This course offers students an opportunity to focus heavily on early African-American films within a classroom setting dedicated entirely to this subject, from the beginnings of African-American film up until the year 1950. Aesthetic trends, political context, and the emergence of early African-American cinema, filmmakers such as Oscar Micheaux and Spencer Williams, as well as genres such as the race movies, will be covered in detail.

A pioneer of African-American cinema.

2. PHI 310 – Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

In this course, students will explore the major philosophical thinkers of ancient and medieval philosophy. Philosophical schools from pre-Socratic times to the time of Augustine will receive emphasis in the course. Students will have their learning supplemented by regular readings and in-class discussions of the material.

The ancient Greek thinker, Socrates.

3. DRA 102 – Principles of Acting

In this course, students will step out of their normal comfort zones to explore the principles of acting, including using facial expression and physical gestures, existing in physical space, acting as a character, and more. Workshops, monologues, and various acting exercises will be incorporated as part of the curriculum for this course.

Masks representing comedy and tragedy.

4. AAS 210 – Black Aesthetic of the 1960s

In this course, students will have the opportunity to explore the music, art, literature, and other cultural products of the African experience during the 1960s in the United States, a key period in African-American history. The products of these media will be understood through the lens of the period’s cultural, political, and social dynamics, especially pertaining to the Civil Rights, Black Power and Women’s liberation movements.

Martin Luther King, Jr. during the Civil Rights Movement.

5. HCTM 300 – Screenplay I

This course teaches students various approaches to writing a screenplay, including three-act structure and other screenplay forms. Students will brainstorm ideas and start to write their own original screenplays (first fifty pages). Students will also have the opportunity to have their own work reviewed in a workshop setting, so that they may later make improvements. The course focuses on the dramatic formula for creating a successful screenplay.

The beginnings of a screenplay.

6. BIO 123 – Mind and Brain

This course provides students with an overview of scientific study of the brain, emphasizing special topics of broad interest. Material will generally be presented by the course director, but guest lecturers (such as neuroscientists) will supplement the course. Course topics include drugs and their effect on the brain; mental health and emotion; appetite and eating; philosophy of mind, memory, attention and thought; the neuroscience of aging; artificial intelligence; and language and communication.

The human brain glowing with blue light.

7. HCTM 235 – Introduction to Film

This is an introductory film studies course offered to students attending Morehouse College. It provides students with an overview of film history; and introduces the key components of a film narrative (characters, dialogue, camera shots), film analysis, genres, and relevant terminology. Students will have the opportunity to take a critical and theoretical approach to the art of film.

A film reel and a student.

8. PHI 201 – Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces students to the scope and nature of philosophical thinking. Students will participate in extensive discussions of a multitude of different philosophical issues and arguments. The most important thinkers to have shaped modern philosophical thought will also be explored with readings and discussions.

Somebody engaging in philosophical thought.

9. BIO 105 – Men’s Health

This course provides an in-depth overview of men’s health issues and their scientific and socio-political contexts. Students be provided with the opportunity to explore social, environmental, political, cultural, and behavioral factors that contribute to health disparities and issues among African American men and other minority groups. Biology is as important to this course as culture, even though biology is the category that it falls under.

A man seeking help with his health issues.

10. HCTM 237 – Introduction to Television

This course provides students with an introduction to television, and covers the beginnings of television, theoretical approaches to television studies, key technical developments, key historical periods and genres, and the socio-political implications of television on the greater culture. Students will learn about the most important history and theory associated with the global phenomenon of television.

An array of different televisions.

10 of the Coolest Courses at Montana State University

Montana State University is a land-grant university located in Bozeman, Montana. The university offers many courses to its over 13,000 undergraduates that can count as electives and not necessarily towards their chosen course of study. Many students may wish to take these courses in order to balance out their academic schedule and ascertain that their workload for the semester will be manageable. Here are ten of the coolest courses offered at Montana State University.

1. CRWR 240RA – Introduction to Creative Writing

This courses introduces students to the principles and techniques of the art of creative writing. Emphasis will be on developing literary craft and the creative process. Students will be exposed to lectures, readings, and writing exercises. They will be expected to work within genres that may be out of their comfort zones and may include fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.

A pencil ready to write about a number of concepts.

2. GDSN 366 – History of Graphic Design

This course provides students with a historical perspective on graphic design work created in the past 125 years. Students will follow the creative trends, technological achievements, and social changes in Western art and design that have affected the work of modern American designers. They will then gain an in-depth understanding of the evolution of the art of graphic design over time, and graphic design’s relationship with social change, technology, and politics.

An assortment of tools used for graphic design.

3. ANTY 1O1D – Anthropology and the Human Experience

This course provides in comparative anthropology focuses on human behavior and human cultural systems from the local to global levels. The human experiences is explored with examples from the fields of archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Different early and modern human cultures will be discussed, and students will gain a deeper understanding of how social and biological factors affect their lives.

The evolution of the modern human.

4. ARCH 221- World Architecture – Modern to Contemporary

This course examines the development of architecture through a historical lens, from the 19th century to modern times. The course will focus on the impact of cultural and philosophic trends, technological breakthroughs and innovations, and the globalization of the digital revolution on our architectural environment over time. Students will be introduced to ideas held by architects and thinkers of the 20th and early 21st centuries and how they affected later architecture trends.

A modern development in architecture.

5. ARTZ 105RA – Visual Language: Drawing

This course will facilitate students’ development of basic drawing skills and concepts as they explore this area of art in-depth for the first time. The course will emphasize observation and visual problem-solving. Representation and expression are explored mainly through black and white drawing media, before color is truly explored in-depth. In-class critiques will help students to develop their ability to express themselves in terms of visual production.

Somebody drawing a girl.

6. ARAB 1o1 – Elementary Modern Arabic I

This is an introductory course designed to introduce students to modern Arabic within a cultural context. Students will gain basic proficiency in communication in the modern Arabic language, while being exposed to relevant history and other knowledge. Video and classroom instruction will be integrated in this course to help students have the best foreign language learning experience possible.

Characters used in the Arabic language.

7. ENSC 110 – Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

This course introduces students to environmental sciences, particularly to those associated with managed and natural ecosystems. Students will gain the ability to identify scientific questions based on issues that are present in our times, and to collect scientific data that will aid in answering questions pertaining to the environment and land management. All students must participate in the field trips designed as a supplementary learning aid to this course.

The Earth, which houses our environment.

8. ARTZ 131 – Ceramics for Non-Majors

This course is an overview of the history, development, and aesthetics of ceramic vessels and sculpture; and the technical aspects of working with clay, glazes, and the firing of ceramic objects. Students will focus on problem solving and the development of ideas when it comes to working with clay, and create their own clay vessels and/or sculptures as they apply the theory they have learned.

Creations made from clay, like bowls.

9. FILM 100IH – Introduction to Film and Photography

This course will introduce students to the arts that use film and photography as their desires media. Students will explore the historical, artistic, and critical connections between photography and film as some of the most influential media shaping the 20th century, and the foundation of the “new media” of the 21st century. Students will also create their own film and photography projects, and be exposed to all that is offered by in-class critiques.

A photographer taking a picture.

10. ARTZ 221 – Painting I

This course introduces students to the art of painting, particularly including oil and acrylic painting. Students will be exposed to basic aesthetic and technical concepts in painting. Subject matter will be primarily representational. Students will study the development of individual stylistic tendencies as they see them develop in their own work in this class. Individual and group critiques will help students to improve on their paintings.

A painting by Vincent Van Gogh.

Health and Wellness Services at UC Merced

The University of California – Merced is a public university located in Merced, California. The university offers a variety of health and wellness resources to its student population of over 6,000 undergraduates. Among these are a variety of resources related to physical, mental, and sexual health. Here are five health and wellness resources offered to students at the University of California – Merced that all current and prospective students should know about.

1. Immunizations

All students at the University of California – Merced are required to complete the following immunizations before initial enrollment: 
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (covered by MMR Vaccine), Varicella (Chickenpox), Meningitis (under age of 22 only, covered by the Meningococcal Conjugate vaccine), Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis (covered by Tdap vaccine) to comply with the UC Immunization Requirement. They also need to complete a TB screening questionnaire. 

Materials used for vaccinations against disease.

2. Travel Clinic

Students planning a trip to a developing country may want to look into information, medications, and vaccinations offered by Student Health Services at the University of California- Merced before embarking on their trip. The fee is $25 for a visit and visits are available to all registered students at the University of California- Merced. A visit to the Travel Clinic provides students with: detailed travel health information, including risks for infection based on planned activities; rief review of medical history and recommended precautions and preventative measures; review of vaccination history, and a discussion of required and recommended vaccinations; and a discussion of prescriptions that are recommended travel medications. 

A map and a stethoscope.

3. Emergency Care

Students who become become ill or have a medical emergency while the Health Center is closed (nights, weekends and holidays) should call 9-1-1 (9-9-1-1 if using a campus phone) or campus police at 209-228-2677, activate a Blue Emergency Phone on campus, or go to the nearest urgent care or emergency room. After receiving emergency or urgent care, students should contact the Health Center for follow-up care. 

Doctors working in an emergency room.

4. Anonymous HIV Testing at the Health Center 

Student Health Services at the University of California- Merced offers free anonymous HIV screening in the Health Center on Thursday mornings. Appointments can be made by calling the Health Center appointment desk at 209-228-2273. The available health educator will provide pre- and post-testing education, while clinical staff at the Health Center will conduct the HIV screening test. Students will be given the results at the time of their appointment, right after the testing is done, though there may be a brief wait time. The testing itself will take 10-15 minutes, but students should stick around after the test until they receive their test results. 

Letter cubes spelling out 'HIV' and 'AIDS.'

5. Women’s Health Services at the University of California- Merced 

Student Health Services at the University of California- Merced provides routine care to meet the healthcare needs of women who are students on campus. Services offered include routine pelvic and breast exams, Pap smears, diagnosis and treatment of vaginal infections, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counseling and prescriptions for contraception, emergency contraception, pregnancy testing and counseling, and specialist referrals. All services are provided in a confidential, supportive atmosphere free of judgment, and patients have different medical professionals that they can talk to for sound, professional advice about their situation, whatever it may be.

A happy and healthy woman